Sunday, February 12, 2012

Christian Bale and I Both Hate Daily Mile

My Saturday was so lovely -- it's own post later -- but this Sunday has been all sorts of lame, and in the mood that I'm in, I can just feel it....bubbling...uh-oh....here it comes.  A rant.

The Rant: Daily Mile.

Really?



I stumbled upon one runner's Daily Mile page (page? is that the right word) a couple months ago, took a quick peek, got really bored, and haven't been back.

Until. I popped back in for a second time yesterday, obliging a blogger who linked to their Daily Mile page.

Same reaction: bore.  But this time, I also met the page with a dose of cynicism.

Guys. Guys, guys, guys, guys.  Guys. Guys? Do we, grown ups, really need a pat on the back (or twenty) every time we get up for a run?

I know WashingtonRunsHere recently posted her thoughts on the silliness of receiving medals for placing 3,874th in a marathon. Or a 5k.  As if we are all so needy for praise and acknowledgement that we must have a prize for doing just average.  Honorable mention, if you will.  However you react to her argument, I'm going to branch off of it and say that nobody deserves a round of applause, or ten "you're such an inspiration" comments, for a daily five- miler.

A lot of bloggers that I really like are on Daily Mile so first of all, I don't hate you for using it, and second, I understand that there are all sorts of justifications for using it.

For example, I foresee the following justifications:

1) It's really nice to have the encouragement of the running community spread all around every day.

My response: I agree there is room for encouragement for many occasions.  Someone may deserve encouragement if they are deathly overweight and are easing into a diet program, three cheers each time they choose an apple instead of french fries.  Or super thumbs up when your toddler first wipes their butt on their own.

However, I'm a fan of not being babied.  The last time I was praised for wiping my butt, I was about two years old.  I don't need congratulations for living through one more day with my hobby (um, running).

Guys I did it! I went running!!!!!! Just as planned!!

So you ran a marathon?  That's a big deal.  Write about it on your blog, on Facebook, on your forehead, and you deserve the praise.  Really you do, especially if you pushed it hard and/or met a time goal.

But please. Your daily workout.  Is not news.

2) Daily Mile is just a short-format Running Blog

I guess it's true that some Running Blogs already receive fawning in the comments over reports of a daily run.   But I think generally there is content that supports the worthiness of blog posts - pictures, thoughts, stories.  Daily mile is two sentences - "eight miles on the treadmill today, 7:58 pace, felt so-so."

OHHHH, GOOO-OOOOOD FOR YOUUU (Christian bale)



3) I do Daily Mile to keep me accountable to my workout schedule.

Hm.  OK.  Then is there some way to turn off the comments function?  So that it doesn't turn into a compliment party?  Cause if not, I'm not buying it, and it still sounds like "please give me attention for each run that I go on."

Sorry.  You can send me hypocrite mail if I ever sign up for Daily Mile, but for today, it strikes me as really needy.   And I still haven't bought into the group-runner mentality, so I'm conditioned to not like this kind of thing.

My rant for the month. Done.

My daily miles? Just shy of 21 miles, 4 of them with the Gentleman, the rest just easy and fun.  I can't believe what a huge difference it is for my body to run 21 miles versus 26.  21? I could probably hit that 3 days a week, recovery time not very necessary.  26 miles?  Strictly elevators for at least 3 days.

Your turn.  Daily Mile? Any reasons I shouldn't blacklist it quite yet?

58 comments:

  1. I have Daily Mile linked on a recent post, but I guess I was following the herd (moo!) with the rest.

    To be honest I'm with you on the first part; I don't need that many compliments on my workouts. I also got stuck in a complimenting cycle with someone where he complimented me on just about every one of my runs and then I felt I had to reciprocate. Comment guilt! Luckily he hasn't said much about mine recently so I'm happier.

    I use daily mile because it's an easier way to view my daily/weekly/monthly progress. I like their graphs for that. I also joined a couple challenges for fun, and I like moving up the ranks there. Doesn't make me highly competitive but it is fun to have two seconds of "hey, top 10!" before I move on.

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  2. The congratulatory aspect of Daily Mile bothers me SO MUCH, I completely agree with you. It's like how every darn kid expects to get a trophy for just showing up. Life doesn't work like that.

    That being said, I *do* use Daily Mile because it's an easier way, at least for me, to keep track of what I've been doing and how far/how fast. I love the numbers, basically. I'm still a newbie to running, and it was great to have the graphs and displays that they use. I still have a traditional pencil-and-paper calendar to plan ahead, but I like recording the stats on DM.

    But....I've just become a Garmin owner, and now Garmin Connect does what Daily Mile USED to do for me. I think DM is being phased out....

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  3. oooh interesting post! So I'm not on daily mile just because I don't feel like learning how to use a new piece of social media. But I do tweet my workouts. I sort of wonder if it annoys people, but I feel like I love hearing about other people's workouts, so I'm more trying to return the favor, if that makes sense.
    I feel the same way about having pics of myself on my blogger header. I personally feel like a jackass for doing it, but I like knowing what other bloggers look like, so I figure others might feel the same.

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    1. Your workout tweets are not annoying. Love when you post your track repeats- it gives me new workouts to try.

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  4. I'm on enough social networks, I don't need one dedicated to running. I like my system, which is basically just a Google Docs tracking my runs and every few weeks uploading the Garmin data.

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  5. I've been saying this same thing for ages. I'm SO with you - I *hate* the social aspect of daily mile (which seems to be the only thing that separates it from other running logs). I like RunningAhead to track my runs - if others want to look at it, great, but I don't need their feedback on my daily workouts. It seems to feed into the whole "listen to your body; you needed a rest day/to cut that run short/to go easy on yourself" mentality. No thanks.

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  6. Nobody cares if you run 5 or 15 miles. They dont. Really. If they are a runner they will compare themselves, snicker, and then write some generic whoohoo. If they are not a runner they just think you are crazy. And into yourself. I run for me. Period. If I race Ill tell you. For the rest of the days I keep a log in a word document. Along with when I bought my shoes or if I fueled with some kind of new gel so I can track my intestinal distress. The 4 mi at 733 pace or the 20 miles in 6 hours posts kill me. Just run. Love it, feel it, but do it for you. And Ill do it for me. I always thought I was alone on the eyeroll bit on the "glorious 5 miles this morning" crap. Thanks Rose.

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  7. I do use Daily Mile. I dont tweet or facebook any of my workout. I usually dont write any extra comments. I also usually dont comment on other people's workout
    I use it to keep track of my training. It is easy and I like how it works. I dont need the good job or my page...but sometimes it is nice to get them.

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  8. It seems not so hard for you to run 20 miles, or place really high in a race. That's not the case for everyone! So I think a little extra encouragement (and medals) are not a bad thing...

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    1. This wasn't intended to divide people by running ability. I would personally be just as bored reading Ryan Hall's daily running journal, and would think it was ridiculous if he had dozens of encouraging comments for each run!

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    2. Seems a bit...urgh I think it's this whole social media culture we are being bred into, I don't think it's anybody’s fault for posting their workouts and expecting congratulatory comments aplenty, it's just a little tiring. It’s like every time I log into facebook I am bombarded with trivial, insignificant information…but I guess that is the nature of the beast. The beast being my relentless newsfeed.

      Anyway, back on track: I like to read blogs about exercise and it's fine if the author wants to mention their work out, but as you pointed out, this can be done in a brief sentence. Then, enough said.

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  9. HA! Love this post. So, I only have 23 friends on Daily Mile, and I'm all set with that. TBH, I don't feel like complimenting *most* people, and I pretty much only do it to be reciprocal about it if they've given me a "Great run!" or "Nice pace!" compliment. Now if people post their race results, I like hearing about that, and I give them props, yk? Especially if they don't have a blog. How would I know how they did otherwise? At any rate, I use it mostly to keep track of mileage over the long haul. I like how it does the "end of the year" report. I'm too lazy to go back through my Excel spreadsheets and do a tally.

    I will tell you something great about Daily Mile that I've experienced though. I've recently met another local runner through Daily Mile who is at a very similar fitness level as me. She has now started running with my primary running partner and me. YAY! Since my running partner is moving in May (*sad face*), it's awesome to have met someone who can now still run with me in the early mornings. If not for Daily Mile, I likely would never have met her. So I can't be a total hater.

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    1. Finding running partners is a great reason for joining Daily Mile!

      I've been more of a "social" runner than a solo runner these days (probably due to the loneliness I experienced while training for last winter's marathon), so I understand the appeal of DM. Running can be a lonely sport, especially if a runner lives in a non-active area like, say, my hometown. When I first started running I didn't know anyone who ran or even exercised regularly. Most people thought I was a weirdo for running so much, so I didn't really talk about it.

      Now there are platforms like Daily Mile, and I can log, brag and discuss everything running. And maybe feel like less of a weirdo. :)

      P.S. While I do have a Daily Mile account, I've yet to enter a workout. I have a profile pic and basic info listed, but that's it ... In my pre-Garmin days I liked Runkeeper (a smartphone app that uses GPS) because it automatically sent my workouts to my Runkeeper page. No extra work required. I used to have my workouts also sent to my Facebook page, before I realized that the daily workout updates could annoy my non-running friends.

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  10. I have a daily mile account, but logged only a couple of runs in it and got bored with it. I would like to keep better account for my miles and could see a use for it that way . . . I found an excel file was easier than DM to keep track of my miles.

    I do like encouraging new runners who are training for their first race on their normal 3-5 mile runs. However, the DM facebooks updates by non-new runners is very annoying

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  11. Marathon medals (heck, even the ones from halves) mean a lot to me because they are life-change souvenirs. I used to weigh 300 pounds, and now I can go 30 miles. Really, when I take the time to sit and look at my medals (we're talking once every few months), I cry because I can't believe how different my life is now. Medals for slow runners might seem silly to someone who places in most races she runs, but to me they hold a lot of meaning. If that makes me needy for praise, so be it.

    I do have a DM account, and I use it mainly for the third reason you listed. Sometimes the comments on simple workouts seem like a bit much, but it's nice to have immediate responses when I have a training question. It's also nice to see exactly what other people are doing - who's doing speed work, training mainly on a treadmill, or running on my favorite trail. Not everyone posts their weekly mileage on their blog (that gets boring, too, sometimes), so it's nice to see a few sentences about how training is going.

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    1. Christina -- I like my race medals too (and I don't mean medals for "placing"). Medals and praise for racing is totally cool with me, and I don't find it silly. I find it silly to require praise for the average training run. Junk miles. Congrats on your amazing accomplishments!

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  12. You must've been way advanced and in that case very deserving of that butt-wiping pat on the back...my 2-year old wipes her butt terribly!

    Medals are for winners, and contrary to popular belief, we are NOT all winners. Finishers medals for a marathon irks me but I find it understandable. I say that as someone who has never won a running race and probably never will. I don't need a medal to do my best.

    DM...I do it. It is my lazy mama's way of keeping track of my miles. I don't really have a plan or schedule I follow and if I write it on paper I'll probably lose it or my 2-year old might wipe her butt with it ;-)

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  13. So I didn't know what I was getting into when I signed up for Daily Mile. I liked having a place to record my workouts since I don't on my blog (that would require posting at some regular interval, barf) and bc Garmin doesn't track XT or treadmill workouts.

    I do have a spreadsheet I keep as my "plan". Aka me from 2 months ago thought you should run __ miles today. Having a place to record all of that is convenient to me. Also, a graph thing that will call me out if I take 5 rest days in a row is a motivator for me. It's like public humiliation.

    HOWEVER, I didn't realize how big a part the social aspect played. Not that I dislike people commending me getting my ass out the door for a tempo when I didn't want to. But I don't like feeling obligated to visit 53219487 other pages and return the virtual high five. Also, I'm not compassionate or complimentary by nature. And I'm lazy.

    I petition for the "comments OFF" ability like you proposed. That way we can all just silently stalk everyone else's training and feed off the jealousy/motivation/competition.

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    1. hahaha sarah "i'm not compassionate or complimentary by nature". I think you're a sweetheart no matter what you say ;).

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  14. I just assume that if people use it, then they've got a reason that works for them, & far be it from me to question or berate it. I guess I don't see why it bothers you so much. Hell, even if someone DOES like getting a bunch of "good job!"s for a short daily run, it's just not something I can get too worked up about one way or the other. ;)

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    1. You must have fantastically low blood-pressure with your ability to never get annoyed! This blog would be boring as hell if I never complained...and I question people's motives pretty regularly.

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    2. Bahahaha I just read this post and loved it, but mostly I love this response.

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  15. I absolutely love you. You're badass enough to speak your mind without sounding overly snarky: I always sound agressive, resentful or jealous (the latter of which I probably am...you obviously have nowt to be jealous of in relation to other people Miss 21 Miles Is Easy).

    I loathe Daily Mile. For just the reasons you listed: it just seems like an excuse to show off. The tone is usually one of 'Nahh *sticking tongue out like a child* I ran today. Did YOU!?' Your comparison to mediocre performances and medal 'rights' is spot on (placing is one thing, walking half a marathon and expecting/having some sense of 'entitlement' when it comes to medals is quite another)- and some people just post ridiculous speeds all the time on there when they've never raced or have any evidence that they actually ran that pace. It all just becomes one huge competition with everyone else and all I ever read about are people getting upset because they're ill/injured/can't keep up with the crowd and thus have nothing to 'post' on Daily Mile. Constantly needing reassurance and congratulations for putting one foot in front of another is beyond 'needy.' It's downright annoying.

    I have my fair share of annoying traits, but I'm not getting a Daily Mile account until Hell freezes over. It's just as bad on Twitter - yes, you ran. Big deal. Stop tweeting every single damn day about it (or multiple times in a day...) with dumbass hashtags attached to every minor update.

    I appear to have hijacked your rant. Sorry.

    As if the post couldn't get any better, you included some serious Christian Bale eye candy. And I almost peed my pants (us British people can do that too...) when I watched the clip. I'm just going to immitate it every time I read a stupid Daily Mile or Twitter update.

    Would you mind if I linked to and/or 'reblogged' this on my blog at all? I think it should win Post of the Year.

    xxx

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    1. I haven't copyrighted anything here, go for it!

      And I'm sure many would disagree that I avoided sounding snarky...but I'm glad you got the tone. Just ranting for a minute, not like my hate for Daily Mile keeps me up at night...

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  16. I think it depends on who your friends are on Daily Mile. I don't have a ton of friends on it, and we don't really do the "ooh, good job!" for every run. Also, more often than not, I write more than a few sentences, but that's just me.
    I'm on DM for reason #3- it's an easy place to put my workouts so that I can see them. I used to use a running log, but it was messy and I had to do math. Also, with DM I can include non-running workouts such as yoga, biking, etc., and then disaggregate the data based on whatever I'm looking for.
    But I hear you. Running two miles, like you do every day, and then spreading it for the purpose of getting praise in cyberspace seems odd to say the least.

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  17. I don't use the Daily Mile, I use Fitocracy (which I gather is similar -- I can get "props" for my workout). I dunno, I like to log my workouts somewhere, and this also allows me to record my weight training and cross training (how's the strength training going with that hip, Rosie?). I could care less about the props but there are a bazillion groups you can join. I've joined one called "runners" and the discussion about running issues is really good. As with everything, your mileage with social media may vary. There are also a variety of challenges which I could see myself signing up for.

    I think my daughter can finally successfully wipe herself and she's 5. She still slips up.

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    1. I am loving the "myrtle" hip exercise routine I posted a couple weeks ago. Can't say my hip feels awesome yet though...

      Go Carydis!!! wipe that butt!! ;)

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  18. I like Daily Mile because I like seeing my friends' progress (even my virtual friends). I find it encouraging. Kind of like "if they can do it, I can too." Which I guess is similar to running blogs, but not everyone blogs, so this is a good way to still keep up with their running. Sometimes the endless comments are kind of annoying. I usually only comment on a post that needs it or is worthy or recognition - such as a race PR or if someone had a really hard workout but got it done (same as I would with a blog post). I also use RunningAhead.com because it provides a lot more stats and graphs.

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  19. I've been using this site for over a year and while I agree with you that it is completely lame, I like that it tracks and adds up my mileage for me. I know that is stupid because I'm a college educated woman that is capable of adding up numbers by myself, but this way I don't have to. Where it is helpful for me is that I coach a lot of beginning runners that often times need and want encouragement and it also gives me the opportunity to keep track of their runs to make sure they are running too hard or skipping all of their workouts. But you are right, it is stupid.

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  20. Well, that's one way to put it. :) I like using Daily Mile to track my miles and work outs. The social stuff sometimes is a bit funny the way there are the attaboys for every little thing. I usually just comment on races. I do like the charts and stuff though.

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  21. I use Daily Mile and I actually really like it. I can bitch and moan about issues that I'm having with the kid in the jogging stroller and get good advice without having to devote a whole blog post to it (which would be boring). Also, I like giving other people encouragement on their runs. I've also met up with people from Daily Mile at races, which isn't nearly as creepy as it sounds.

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  22. I don't mind it - it's interesting to see other people's daily workouts and not have to read an entire blog post. It can get kind "cheery and overly positive" sometimes, but overall, I it's not enough to turn me off. Some people really like to give encouragement, I think, it makes them feel good so hey, if they want to comment, cool.

    I actually prefer Runners World training log though. It's much more data-centric and I can track my shoe miles. So, I kind of do both which sort of bugs me - the double-work, but whatever. I guess it doesn't bug me enough to drop one of them.

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    1. I track my shoe miles on Daily Mile-- you add "gear" aka your various running shoes, and when you log a run, you pick which shoe you were wearing, so it keeps a running total of the mileage on each of your shoes.

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  23. Dang, I had no idea there was so much hate towards dailymile! I joined it to keep track of my runs after I forgot my nano on a couple of runs and couldn't input the information anywhere on nike+. I'm sure there's other sites that are great for this, but I happened to stumble across dailymile first so now all my information is on there (by all, I mean since September when I started running). I love looking at statistics, haha.

    As a new runner, I do enjoy getting feedback when I have questions or need suggestions. Maybe it's a phase but I know I still have lots to learn so I enjoy reading what other people have to say as well as reading about their training/race experiences. I have a blog but not a lot of people actually read it, so while I do write about running on there, I don't usually get a ton of feedback. First and foremost though, my purpose of using dailymile is to track my workouts (it does also track shoe miles). The encouragement from other people is nice.

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  24. So, I use my blog as a way to track my daily workouts and put pictures of my butt on the internet so randos can jerk off to me. And I'm cool with that.

    Anyway, I thought Daily Mile was just...like...Runkeeper or something. A place to track your workouts, see your weekly mileage, get stats and stuff. I didn't know it was yet another circle jerk (because, let's be fair, most blogging is just one huge circle jerk. I'm totally cool with that. If I did impressive stuff I'd have a better blog and less training content, but that's my problem).

    I guess, if people like it and need it, well, no one is forcing you to gold star their daily run. But, that doesn't mean you can't still think it's silly.

    As for race medals, it's all a scale issue. Some people, finishing a 5k is ground breaking shit, and they will treasure that medal for years. And hey, that's awesome. Everyone should have healthy outlets. I was like that the first few times I ran a 5k. Now? Less so, because I've moved on to things that, to me, are more ground breaking. Example: I'm still butthurt that my last triathlon didn't have race medals. I didn't place, but I left my ass on that course. Maybe six triathlons from now I won't care. Scale.

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  25. This is super interesting to me. I had no idea there were DM haters! I love dailymile. When I started to run, I found it to be: 1) a super helpful resource and 2) a source of accountability. As dumb as it sounds, knowing that I was going to log a workout actually kind of helped me get out the door some days - I never wanted to see a big 'zero' next to weekly mileage. Quite frankly, I don't think most people on it are logging their workouts just in order to receive pats on the back for doing them.

    Now that I've been running awhile (and actually enjoy it), I log my workouts there because I can easily see my weekly/monthly/yearly stats and track all of my gear. I supposed I could just as easily do all of this in a spreadsheet but I've actually found the community there to be incredibly supportive - much like the blogging community. Also, um, I don't have a blog and sometimes I want to brag a little bit about my races too.

    Bottom line for me - I don't see why any runner should poo-poo motives of other runners. Who cares if people sign up for races for the shirt or the medal? Who cares if they went for a run so that they could get 20 dailymile comments? They're out exercising, which is a hell of a lot more than most people are doing.

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    1. Aaaand for the record, I didn't mean for this to come off as bitchy as it reads. Tough day at the office.

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  26. Meh, I like Daily Mile. I don't think about or analyze it to the point that you have in your post here (not being a bitch, you know I'm your biggest fan). I don't think the website is a big deal or reveals anything psychological about a person or that they are "needy". I used to track my mileage and pace in an excel sheet, but now it's all stored on the interwebs and that's great. Honestly, I sign on to DM, log my workouts and sign off. I don't comment on anyone else's workouts or add friends or really care to see what other people have done. It's a platform I used to track MY workouts because being the nerdy person I am, I like how easily I can gander at my mileage & workouts by week/month/year. So please, don't generalize and assume all Daily Mile users are just posting workouts to compare themselves to others or receive praise. I run for ME, no one else. And if the motivation from strangers DOES works for you, then post the shit out of your workouts!

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  27. Excuse me, but my once a week two-miler deserves applause and accolades.

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  28. Eh, I bore my husband with details of my runs. "I just ran 4 miles. Without stopping". Uh, good job hon. "No, seriously, 4 miles. Aren't you impressed." Yeah, great job. Keep it up. Then his eyes kind of glaze over. I track the details in Excel so I know how I'm doing.

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  29. I use DM, but I have zero friends on it. I like the weekly reports and how easy it is to analyze my 'data.' I am a statistics nerd though. Also at the end of the year I got a really cool report on all my runs and even a tally of all the donuts I'd burned through.
    I agree that the false praise is lame, but overall I like DM.

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  30. Wow! This sure got a lot of awesome responses out of people. Too bad I know nothing about Daily Mile so I have nothing to offer to the topic! But I do know I love you and your rants and I say keep em coming!

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  31. I like DM for the purpose of tracking runs/workouts. Like others have said it keeps track of weekly/monthly/yearly miles. I have a journal but I don't always get around to it so when I fail DM has my miles logged.

    I cannot go and give virtual high fives to every single runner/athlete there. Although I would love to I just do not have the time to do so. I am an encourager by nature so I think it's hreat to have the ability to motivate others when they need it. We all need to be lifted up at times.

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  32. I started using it a few months ago for my *own* personal use. I don't "friend" anyone or take part in any conversations. (I'm honestly not even sure how that works.) I just like it bc they have have neat little charts that track my workouts, highest milage weeks, lowest, all at a glance.

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  33. I really like Daily Mile for the tracking aspect. I suppose I could all just keep it in a notebook or word document, but it's easy for me to track my mileage, speed, and how many miles are on my shoes using DM. Comments are wack (you'll just have to trust me that I think this), and if I could turn them off, I would.

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  34. Haaaaaaaa! I linked to your article from Jessica's blog, and I literally cannot stop laughing out loud! I deal with parties, but I simply loathe compliment parties, especially about exercise! But on the other hand, I'm a venture capitalistic yogi, so perhaps I should start DailyChatarangaAddict.com or something of the sort. There's good advertising in it, I'm sure. - nicole marie story

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  35. gahhh I was just thinking about this!!...this post makes me want to delete my dailymile... :)
    originally I really enjoyed reflecting on my run(thoughts&speed), comparing my weeks, and getting ideas from my super fast friends. But now that you've mentioned the part of DM that I dislike (the rah rah you ran comments!) my thoughts have changed and I now feel like I'm setting myself up for compliments from random people...blah.
    It's like the time my brother told me that your nose will always be in your line of vision.
    My thoughts about DM are definitely mixed
    I hope you're having a great week! are you racing anytime soon? lets run 21-fun miles together!

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  36. Maybe I'm weird, but I refuse to congratulate or fawn over people I don't know. Especially in the blog world, bloggers get hundreds of comments on how great and inspiring they are and I can't take it. No one deserves that much praise for exercising and eating healthy. No one. And I certainly don't find it inspiring, it just feels like most bloggers are looking for affirmation and compliments. The only people who will hear that much praise from mu lips are people who risk or devote their lives to improving the lives of others - and that certainly ain't happening through running.

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  37. I think my main annoyances with effusive praise for training runs are the following:
    1. Commenters have no idea what they are talking about. Do you KNOW that this 5-miler was a "great job!!"? of course not.
    2. If you are told you are fantastic for every goddamn thing, there is no way to praise you for a truly semi-fantastic thing.
    I keep an online running log that is comment-enabled, but mostly because I write stupid run commentary and want people to tell me how funny I am.

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  38. lol douche... maybe it's just used to keep track of times and races. technology is pretty sweet eh?

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  39. My husband agrees with you on reason number 2. When he has seen me typing in Daily Mile, he has said, "isn't this why you have a blog?" I really wish Garmin Connect and Daily Mile could make a perfect little workout-tracking baby. Garmin is my main tracker, I like the calendar functions, the search options when you want to go back...but I like the visuals that Daily Mile provides- weekly and monthly. I have found other people through DM that are training for the same races I am and it was nice to connect with them. I'm not necessarily putting my workouts there to get high fives...I'd be ok not getting any comments, I just like pretty colorful bar graphs. I don't go out of my way to comment on other people's workouts usually just if they write funny descriptions or I know they are building back their running, coming back from an injury.

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  40. I'm super late to this, but I'll talk anyway...

    I use daily mile more to see how other people are training and what they are training for. It fascinates me to read about how somebody trains for a 50 miler, an ironman, a sub 17 5k, a sub 1:20 half marathon, etc. I also like using it to find folks doing the same races as me so that I can have a bunch of online buddies to discuss training, setbacks, and anxiety. I'm doing a half ironman in two weeks, and found somebody from Philly doing the same race via daily mile. It's been GREAT to talk about training and preparation for several months.

    I don't care if people comment on my workouts. Or if they even look at them.

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  41. People use different facets for all different purposes whether you need a pat on the back for every run or to track your progress. I have made running friends in the area that I run with occasionally and I personally haven't really felt much of your opinions. Different strokes for different folks - If it doesn't suit you, there are other websites that can accommodate your needs.

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  42. I use daily mile and have never had a comment placed on my run. Who are all these people making comments on your workouts? I use it as a log, so I know how far I've run in a certain period of time. I'm glad no one comments on it. I wouldn't use it if they did.

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  43. Yeah...a little late, but my 2 cents worth: I use DailyMile and while I used to love it (I rarely make comments unless I know someone has been struggling with exercise in general. We all need encouragement from time to time) I am not very happy with them right now. Much like I'm not happy with Nike+. I can't import my data to any new tracking programs. I can export my dailymile data to a CSV but then they put my duration in seconds and my mileage in meters. WTH? I have been struggling trying to find a good tracking site that would allow me to export my data in a useful way. Right now, I'm trying training peaks and it seems ok. I really liked the simplicity of DM though. I'm also too lazy to keep up with a spreadsheet...out of site, out of mind.

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  44. Dailymile is a tool for me to track workouts....plain and simple. Whether you write it down, store it on a document or use an application to do such is up to you. Don't be so critical of others, its really not your say. Just glad we have options.

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  45. I'm just reading through your blog for the first time (and loving it). Well, maybe other people are more likable on dailymile than I am, because I rarely get any comments or compliments. I didn't even realize until your post that people get fawned over and might even use it for that purpose! Although maybe it's like when I used to be on JDate and everyone else would be like "I get so many messages!" and I never got any.

    I actually really like dailymile and have been using it since 2011 because it is the only way I keep track of my workouts. I like being able to look back and see how an old workout went, or look at how many miles I have on my current running shoes, etc. I also love nostalgia, so it's nice to be like "OH LOOK REMEMBER HOW SLOW I USED TO BE THAT WAS CUTE."

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    1. Hey! Blast from the past. I think DM has evolved since the post. Come to think of it, I never see the blogger braggy brag daily mile stuff anymore. I swear this used to be relevant.

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