Thursday, July 19, 2012

Only if You're Positive

Here's a thought.

I was thinking about blog comments on large blogs.  I was thinking about how they are usually a collection of: 1) praise/butt-kissing, 2) interesting thoughts or entertaining commentary, and 3) criticism--sometimes pegged as "a mean comment".

So three categories, yes? Maybe subcategories in there.  This applies to all blogs, running blogs, and is also something I noticed reading the fun comments in Ashley Spivey's bachelor blog (JUST as fun as watching the show, I swear...she has access to every screen shot, which makes for entertaining photo stills).

Anyway, looking back at those categories of comments.  I'm going to attribute a percentage to them.

Butt-kissing: 70%
Valuable input: 29%
Criticism/nastiness: 1%

That's a whole lotta love! Perhaps some of it warranted.  And amidst all the support is a tiny blip of meanness.

Why does praise far outweigh criticism on blogs? I think it may be because we are supportive people by nature....or because commenters desire reciprocal praise.  Or maybe it is because as the 14th century adage goes, "if you don't like it, then stop reading, nanner nanner nah", and people largely follow this ancient wisdom, so they're not around to criticize.

Whatever the reasoning, isn't it something, that the 1% of comments pegged as criticism get such a disproportionate amount of attention, backlash, and defensive action by the blogger and said blogger's readers?

For instance, consider this hypothetical comment, on any blog--running, fashion, parenting, cooking, etc.: "Amazing!! You are a wonder woman, and my hero and idol and GIRL, you go girl, there is NOBODY better than you!!"  (by the way, I have totally commented like that before....it's hard not to get excited for friends who post about great accomplishments.  And I have smiled hard when receiving comments like this!).  

This complimentary comment might be replied to with a "thank you!" or "I agree", or more likely, skimmed over.  But it would never receive a "geez, don't get your panties so twisted, I didn't do anything THAT amazing.  It was just a recap/recipe/kid activity."

So, after 50 comments of pure love, LOVE love love, there might be this comment:

"love your blog, long time reader, but I disagree with xxxxx part of your post. That part was totally inaccurate/offensive.  Today, I find your blog annoying as shit."

And all hell breaks loose.

"if you don't like it, then stop reading!"
"get a life and stop being so jealous"
"haters gonna hate"
"Blogger, don't listen to what that person says, I LOVE you still, I 50-shades-of-grey love you.  I'm so hot and bothered!"

Human nature you know, to focus on the negative and forget about all of the positive, even when the balance is 99% to 1%.  But still, I find it so laughable that many bloggers become so defensive or bitter about criticism; it shakes them up, makes them lament that blogging is HARD....even though 99% of the time authoring a blog is an enormous ego-inflating free for all.

There exists a place for fair criticism--that I posit is not worthy of attack--and then on the other hand there is true Trolling, full of bad words and deranged crazy hate that can only happen on the internet or when you get too close to a homeless person whose brain has been fried into oblivion by drugs (ahem, I'm talking to you homeless chick who biked past me yelling "anorexic beaner fat bitch").

Aside from the rare troll, bloggers get so much support.  If they ever whine about internet negativity, tell them to clam it.  So much support! People who don't know me support my running 290834028 times more than my own family members do! And more than some of my closest friends! That is a bizarre thing to earn by doing little more than typing up your thoughts.  You get a lotta love for little output.  So don't go complaining when you get a little hate.

That said....I'm human; I feel GREAT when I read supportive comments so I have no complaints about the sway towards positivity in blog comments on this smaller blog. 

This guy will punch you if you don't LOVE this post


And I will applaud you and allow you to stay if you type that you love me

But if you just type something witty, I might get confused.


I thought I was going somewhere with this.  But I don’t know where....hmmm, how to close the deal...  Help me finish this up: what can be said about this dynamic of bloggers growing to expect praise, to the point where anything critical is pegged as "jealous"?

I’m curious, if you don’t have a blog, what is your take on all the love that is given to bloggers?  I remember back when I didn’t have a blog but I read them, I truly did think that many bloggers were awesome, I loved them, and I would think it was a BFD if one of them agreed to meet me or replied to my comment.  Now that I know what it’s like to have a blog, and I know how easy it is to throw any piece of crap up on to the internet….not as impressed.  Much more judgey.  Still have crushes on some bloggers, but realize they are very human and not….all that special.

If you do have a blog, what is your take on positive v. negative comments?  Do you love the support? Do you feel weird about receiving so much of it?  Do you believe any of it?  Does all of the love outweigh the occasional “hate”, or does the hate linger much louder?


*****RUNNING*****

With hitting the track for intervals once or twice a week, I've neglected any "tempo" runs, which to me means a run that includes several miles at a faster, not comfortable speed.  I have done maybe 10 of these in the past year, all on the treadmill, usually by running in the 6:20 to 6:50 pace zone for 1 hour.  I've never run this kind of "tempo" run outside.

Until nowwwwwwwww.

I ran it at the track, because while potentially dizzying, trying to tempo anywhere else would involve stop lights and people dodging and lots of tight little turns.

20 laps without any breaks = 5 miles at "slightly uncomfortable pace".  It felt comfortable enough--especially compared to what I'm usually doing at the track--through about mile 4.  And by listening to talk radio, it ended up not being as boring as running 20 straight laps might sound (actually, that just made it sound MORE boring I think...).

Also, it was raining even though it was July 17 in CALIFORNIA, a forecast that didn't even cross my mind.  I forgot to tell y'all that my summer running has been a breeze compared to yours...because it's been in the 60's and 70's in my hood (I recall one hotter weekend).  Don't worry, you'll have a huge leg up on me during the fall races with your extra challenging 100-degree-weather training.

6:23; 6:28: 6:29; 6:30; 6:23.

I guess if "tempo" is supposed to be faster than half-marathon pace, I didn't quite manage that. This is about my goal half-marathon pace.  Still a challenging workout, so good enough for me.

50 comments:

  1. Um, well, there is the matter of those bloggers who delete/moderate comments, which could skew what you actually see.

    Many bloggers have little interest in getting actual feedback, so if I disagree, why should I bother writing anything?

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    1. I completely forgot to consider this--moderating comments. True, I guess that is dusting it under a rug instead of attacking/getting defensive.

      Delete
  2. You always have interesting posts. Some of my most valuable comments on my blog have been critiques/criticism. For instance, back in early 2011 I had just gotten injured twice in a month with right ankle injuries from playing soccer. A commenter said that I need to stop playing soccer, since it was causing injuries. At the time I still really liked soccer, but he was right in the end. I needed to stop playing soccer because it wasn't worth the risk.

    So I like people giving it to me straight on comments, even if it may be perceived as criticism. And if I think another person has a post that seems out there or I think they are being ridiculous, I try to tell them that.

    Oh, and going back to your distance runner post, I'd be curious if that guest blogger could write about who the top US male distance runner is. I thought about it, and Jim Ryun is the main name that came to mind. He did a sub 4 min mile in high school on a dirt track. Badass.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kaGDIKoh-g8

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    1. I think he may do another guest post at some point, so I'll pass this tip on! I knew YOU would like his post -- in fact, I think Doc Runner would love your blog.

      Delete
  3. (in real life) People have told me I seem to be negative or quite the criticizer... Pats on the back are nice but how do you improve anything, personally or professionally, without knowing the negative. That goes without saying a 'Good Job' here and there does put a smile on my face but 99% of the time I'd like to know the negative so I can do a better job. I just sent an email to my coach that I have loved all the congrats/good jobs about my recent race - but point out all the bad and analyze everything I can do better. Telling me I rocked it doesn't help me improve as an athlete.


    and with that being said - HOLY FREAKING FAST GIRL! :) lol. I cant wait to see multiple 6 miler's on my watch.

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  4. OMG! This is a totally awesomeamazeballssauuce post!!!!! You are so freakin' cool and smart and talented!!!! I LOVE YOU! I love you so much that I've decided to get you a pet so that you can join in on conversations with all of your newly-babied friends. A pet is sort of like a baby, right? So I am on the hunt for a medium to large-sized mangy rat with bloody patches where the scabs have been scratched off because I know you have a real fondness for these things. I've been setting out traps… Oh, and that tempo is too slow for you. You should have felt uncomfortable well before the 4-mile mark. Just being honest. Which is what you want, right? And the 'focusing on the negative' thing…god, that human tendency is really raking me over the coals right now…you hit that nail squarely on the head :( We all need therapy.

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    1. Who doesn't love scabs. Nom. Nom. Nom. Eeew - now that's gross.

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  5. Victoria hit the nail on the head: there are thousands, if not millions, of negative comments that we never get to see. I know, because I've left a fair few of them on some of the 'big' blogs and one particular smaller one where the author actually posted a disclaimer that she will not post comments that are not positive. 'There's no room for negativity on my blog!' she chirped. Negativity meaning anything less than hero-worship.

    I do really look up to speedy and somewhat badass bloggers such as yourself, but because I guess I don't have a self-censoring button no matter how much I like a blogger, if there's something hypocritical or contradictory in a post I'll point it out. And fair enough if people do the same to me - I know I talk a lot of crap most of the time!

    And I second the 'Holy Craps' on your splits. Jesus, I'm lucky to see ONE six minute mile in training outside of a race. Your workouts always make me want to punch the air with vicarious glory.

    xxx

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  6. I think that is an interesting take on the whole commenting thing. I would actually APPRECIATE a little constructive criticism every once in a while...because then you know that someone is either a.) Being completely honest (especially if they are usually writing cheerleader comments) and/or b.) They have taken the time to actually read and think about what you have written. Plus, how do you improve if you don't get any feedback?! You said it - we aren't perfect...just normal people and if we want to get better (at anything) we kind of need to know where we suck.

    P.S. I also tell my supervisors this at work because they tend to be the same when it comes to reviews, etc. "You are great. You did good work." Um, okay, but how can I do BETTER?!

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    1. True! Criticism requires way more thought from a reader than someone who pops in to say "love you and your oatmeal/workout, bye!"

      Delete
  7. I'm usually the type of person that keeps negative comments to myself, but I find it puzzling when people get all bent out of shape when someone disagrees with them. Haven't they had a job before? As a teacher, you have many performance reviews and they are required to tell you what you needs to do better. My coach in college gave us a review at the end of the season, and he always included what we were doing wrong. It stinks when you realize your not perfect, but I realized that when I turned 7. If you are secure with yourself, you can learn from criticism, and if they are truly crazy, laugh about it and brush it off! People need to chill out!

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  8. I tend to only comment when I have positive/neutral things to say (neutral things here being questions or "I like soup, too!" or other such blathery). I tend to chicken out on negative comments because I worry way (way) too much about how the person on the receiving end will take it. And, to be honest, I also don't want to get the string of negative comments on MY negative comment! (Isn't it interesting how the positive people turn negative as soon as something negative infiltrates their positivity?)

    I used to write and blog professionally and get a LOT of negative comments (and, granted, a lot of positive ones, too, but those didn't grab my attention the same way), and while the quantity blunts the sting of any individual comment after a while, it's still exhausting. I also only comment (positively or negatively) if it's something I'm comfortable having my name behind, as I think anonymous comments are the easy way out.

    Also: "I 50-shades-of-grey love you"? Kind of want to steal that and start saying it in my everyday life.

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    1. Please use that phrase. And I think professional blogs do get much more heated debate, don't they? I would recommend not chickening out on the negative comments....if the blogger is worth their words, they will be able to receive it well.

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  9. Soooooo this post brought me out of my creepy "read blogs but never comment" shell. I'd imagine there are LOTS of us. Mostly I never comment because...well, what do I say? I think it's because quite often I feel like there aren't a lot of options besides what you've mentioned! "HEY! You are great! And reading about your running inspires me to keep running, too!" or "Oh god, I don't give a CRAP that you had a granola yogurt today. shutup already. please". But what will these comments accomplish REALLY? Usually the answer is...not much.

    I'm fairly new to the whole running blog world. I started reading them recently because for some reason I really love reading about strangers lives and why they run (oh god, that makes me sound like a weirdo). It's fascinating to me! I just love the idea that, hey, any normal person can toss some words on the internet and share their thoughts and I can read them! Sure, there are lots of dumb dumby dumb thoughts out there, but in the midst of it there's this awesome since of comraderie...even if I never comment. I can read somebody's post about having an amazing run and think "AH! Now I can't wait for my run today!". It's an awfully nice feeling. I also think it has something to do with the fact that most of my friends don't really want to hear me babble on about my running so reading running blogs is a great way for me to feel like I'm not alone in this whole loving to run thing.

    So it's funny seeing you write that bloggers are just normal people who aren't very special because...really...that's why I like them!

    As far as criticism goes: if someone's ego is SO FRAGILE they can't handle one little negative comment on their blog...they've got to get their priorities straight! It's the internet. Besides sometimes it's more fun to open up a dialogue about the criticism then to say "Thanks SOOOOOO much for loving me so hard!".

    Anyway! That's all from me!

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    1. SENSE not SINCE. See, this is why I never post comments...haha.

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    2. Don't go back in your shell! At least when you have something interesting to say, like here.

      That's one of my favorite things about this blog--I don't have that outlet about one of my strongest passions (running) in my daily life. A few people are curious, but most aren't.

      Delete
  10. I have to read this post in two sections because I want to comment on the blog positivity/negativity before I go on to the running part.

    One of my good blogging friends - hell, maybe she reads your blog, I have no idea - recently came under some criticism and she retaliated accordingly, posting about the unnecessary negativity, etc. etc. Her readers responded with many uplifting and wonderful comments supporting her, and she really is a fabulous person. Being the blog stalker that I am I sifted through some recent old posts to see what could have sparked such a vehement reply and the first comment I found was one that was criticism, yes, but not necessarily negative or pointing any fingers or anything like that. It was criticizing, offering advise, and even going so far as to say that it wasn't meant to be negative.

    I understand fully that it can be upsetting when you come under any criticism, but I also think that, as bloggers, it's our responsibility to understand that there are times when people will disagree with us AND THAT'S OK. We put our lives out there for the world to read, agree with, and criticize. Especially if you're posting about a sensitive and somewhat controversial topic - there will always be people who disagree and have no issue saying so.

    I think it discourages people from posting their true thoughts (both bloggers and commenters) when they're afraid of any sort of negative retaliation, and what's the point of blogging if you aren't willing to accept all comments (bear in mind, I am excluding the comments that are malicious and mean-spirited, and only am advocating that it's ok to write criticism or disagreeance with a post).

    ReplyDelete
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    1. Right, right. I want true thoughts! Stop discouraging criticism, people!

      Delete
  11. Umm...this is not butt-kissing but pure fact, lol...you are incredibly fast...like uber fast and impressive. I don't comment negative things because I don't like negativity, lol and I think it's awesome that people are out doing their own thang...people should just be happy for each other and calm their britches. ;)

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  12. I don't get many negative comments (not because I'm awesome, but because I don't have very many readers), but when I do, I don't delete them (and I can't stand it when people heavily moderate their comments). Some stuff is mean and I really don't get why the person is wasting their time writing it, but I appreciate people that disagree in a respectful way (like on my post about why I wanted to get an epidural).

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  13. And I forgot to say (and some people mentioned it above), is why have a blog if you aren't going to publish or accept negative/constructive comments? Seems like a blog is useless then if you aren't getting the truth from people. Being truth generally leads to improvement or deeper thoughts. If you want to hear yourself talk and stoke your ego about how great you are, then do it elsewhere besides a blog.

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  14. I do have a blog. Actually the whole comment thing is what turned me off from that whole blog thing. It just seems extremely insincere for the most part. Everything someone does is not OMGamazing. It just is not.

    You do write about interesting topics and sometimes get interesting comments/debate. On the other hand, I mostly just wrote about workouts/races and started to feel like it didn't add much to my life.

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    1. I'm so confused by blogs with 200 comments, that are all less than 10 words each. Insincere, yeah, mostly.

      Delete
  15. I just wanted to say that I love your blog, long time reader, but I disagree with 99% of your post today and who really cares if someone likes your posts. Today, I find your blog annoying as hell. You just wasted 2 mins of my life.

    :) j/k

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    1. oh no. you didn't. Let's do this:

      Haterade, don't read my blog if you don't like it then. But you're probably super jealous and will be back to read my perfectness everyday anyway. So jealous. I'm perfect. Don't forget.

      Delete
  16. I think it all depends on the intention of the comment. You can tell when a comment is constructive/helpful critique. Then there are those that come across as snarky and you can tell the intention is not positive but to dig at the person. If the comment is snarky/nasty... then I am under the keep your comment to yourself bc it doesn't have any positive outcome. I think there are a decent amount of jealous/negative peeps out there and they aren't really my cup of tea. But I welcome constructive criticism.

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    1. I can't lie, I like a little snark here and there. Guilty as charged. But constructive criticism is probably more valuable...

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  17. Blogging can be like Dailymile - a whole lot of "Great workout!" when I'm thinking, "That was actually a pretty poor workout." I guess the world if full of smiley people.

    You are hilarious for listening to talk radio while running on the track. That might be the most boring combination ever.

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  18. I get a bit of praise comment, mostly after a rant. So far no nastiness gets through spam filters. I don't count disagreeing as nastiness. I find the endless blogger love on some blogs to be a bit nauseating and over the top. Yes, it's nice to tell someone you like their blog, or that it's well written, or they have a cute kid, or whatever, but lets not go overboard. They aren't going to have sex with you no matter how much smoke you blow up their butt.
    My take on it is that people that want to read my blog will do so, and that's fine, since I write it for me.

    Some commenter earlier said you are a very fast runner. I agree.

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  19. If I weren't so tired I could say something thoughtful about the "negativity" issue, but alas all I have to offer is this: the older I get, the more I realize just how many adults are emotionally stuck at the 8th grade level. They may hide it under the trappings of maturity, but under stress, it always shows.

    Also, a lot of bloggers, despite the fact that they spend a lot of time pouring words onto the internet, aren't actually very good communicators.

    And finally, I'm sorry, but some of these chicks are living extremely sheltered lives, so someone snarking at them - or even offering useful, constructive criticism - counts as a source of major stress. Ok, that sounds judgey, and it's true that you never know someone's true story just from reading a blog, so I feel kind of bad writing it, but I still think I might have a point...

    And yeah, Roserunner=speedy.

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    1. Is there some correlation between the bigger the blog = the more sheltered the author? This might actually be science.

      Delete
    2. YES. Agree this is definitely science. It's not an actual job to write a peanut butter granola recipe and then photograph it and then wait for your perfect hubby to taste it, is it?!! But fml because I can't seem to stop reading it and then mathematically counting all the ways my life is less peanut buttery wonderful.

      Delete
  20. Such an interesting post. I don't moderate negative comments, because like you said-they are there in real life, they are there in the blog. I actually get a bit annoyed sometimes though (not bent out of shape just...yeah okay...), when people read something on a blog and they are like oh my god they are so amazing...blah blah blah...every single post. For instance, there are some people that never read the actual post, just praise until the sun comes out about how awesome you did. That is really the only thing that annoys me in the blogging world. Negative critism is fine. ha.

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  21. I agree with pretty much everything you said here. I never really thought about this very much until I read the recent "controversial" post on Skinny Runner's blog-- which wasn't even a controversy at all. She had a guest post with some chick hawking diet pills, and even acknowledged in her preface that she knew there'd be some criticism on the post. Out of like 120 comments there were maybe 3 or 4 people who weren't totally fawning all over themselves to compliment the girl who lost weight, and those people were attacked by all the other commenters as fat, rude, jealous haters. What really surprised me was that SR joined in herself and said some rude things in reply to the few people who (politely) disagreed with the post itself. I don't know what's worse, the million commenters who just post to say "you go girl! anyone who doesn't like the diet pills is an ugly hater!!!!!!!!" or the bloggers themselves who take themselves so seriously that they can't handle even the tamest comments in disagreement with their content. One more thought: have you ever read KathEats blog?? Her commenters are beyond hilarious because they're all just basically commenting on her boring posts about oatmeal so that they can get link-backs to their own blogs. She'll post a picture the same bowl of disgusting slop she eats every day and there'll be 172 comments from the typical blogger "Eat, Laugh, Spin, Munch Crunch, Healthy, Love" just saying "yum! have a great day Kath :) :) :)" Just.... ugh. Stop it, guys.

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    1. Yes, SR's blog is one that comes to mind with this issue. I don't read KathEats, and for the life of me, have no idea why anybody does. NO IDEA. I'll have to check out the comments, although this sounds like what I see on Cupcakes&Cashmere

      Delete
  22. OK, maybe I am a total bitch (probably), but the overwhelmingly positive, butt-kissing comments have completely ruined the blog reading experience for me. I seriously cannot handle it when regular people are treated like deities. I was always raised to only accept a compliment when I truly deserved it, and to remain humble about normal/everyday accomplishments. I cannot imagine the kind of ego these big bloggers have with the incessant praise they receive on an daily basis. No wonder they fancy themselves as inspirational figures. Not to be mean, but most of the bigger bloggers are completely mediocre in most things they do, and yet their readers WORSHIP them - sending them gifts in the mail, approaching them on street for photographs. The part that makes me dislike these bloggers the most is the fact that none of them have ever stood up and said "I don't deserve all this praise". They just accept it, because they really do believe they are THAT great.

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    1. How does ones ego NOT inflate with that much praise? I think it must. That's a problem. That's why we must all bravely criticize! :)

      Delete
  23. Half Marathon pace bites. It's so hard. I'm honestly getting more into "steady state" runs than tempos. They are very effective and don't leave your legs in misery the next day so you can get some quality in.

    One of the reasons I put off starting a blog was because I had read complaints about all the "jealous haters" and now I've started to realize that most of the haters have a point. Usually if someone points out a douchy behavior the behavior was in fact douchy. I've only received one negative comment so far. You better believe I'm keeping that stuff unmoderated. I don't want anyone to think "YOU CAN"T HANDLE THE TRUTH!"

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    1. Blogger crush alert. You're the coolest. I'll try to balance this comment out with a meaner one at some point.

      Delete
  24. As usual, the comments on this post are as good as the post itself. (I just wanted to go into an "OMG, you and your readers are totally awesomesauce...squeeeeee!!! awesome" but since there's no sarcasm font...)

    I think it is a skill to be able to take constructive criticism well and to take it as something that can help you improve rather than to take it personally and to take it as "you are a bad person because of this." I think this is especially for people who are currently in their 20s because many of them grew up in an environment where they were "special snowflakes" who were encouraged to do everything their own way, that their way is perfect for them, and that they could do no wrong. Part of that isn't even their fault - it was the cultural environment they were raised in. Now they're left not knowing how to deal with how to take that criticism and use it.

    Part of being a grown up though is to learn how to make that initial sting of criticism last only for a second and then figuring out what you can learn from it. (and I say this all about genuine constructive criticism and not just assholery)

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  25. The whole "commenting on blogs" thing is weird to me. I'm a runner, I like to read about other people's training and racing, and I've been doing it long enough that I feel like I've learned some stuff along the way. Occasionally I've posted a comment when I see something that suggests someone has lost perspective on what they're doing, or suggest a slightly different approach to their training, but it is hard to do it in a way that doesn't sound jealous/mean. Or like a brag about how awesome I am (like "my PRs are way faster than yours so why are your long runs 30 seconds per mile faster than mine? Please slow down for your own good.")

    The other thing I think is strange is when a post really rubs me the wrong way (like maybe "here are the [never scientifically studied] supplements from GNC I take that you maybe should take too" or the "hey, I've learned that I am much faster if I run fewer miles" posts) - followed by many many comments agreeing with the blog or saying things like "Yeah, I get hurt if I run over 20 miles per week too! Yay us - we will be just as fast without running the miles." I want to say "No, you probably won't" - but again, don't want to be labeled a jealous hater.

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  26. I actually got a fairly negative comment a while back, and while the tone definitely made me grumble and consider a snarky reply, for once I did the mature thing and said something like, "I'd love to have a dialogue with you about this. Here's my email address so we can continue to talk."

    Anddd of course the person never emailed me.

    Negative comments definitely blow, and I would be lying if I said I was good at taking them in stride. But, I feel like the best we can all do is just reply as thoughtfully as possible, and if the negative (or even slightly critical) comment leads us to a good conversation or to learn something about ourselves/our blog, then...good. And if the commenter wants to just be an asshole, then...fuck 'em. The end.

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  27. Love.this.post. Probably because a week or so ago I was that person (I know, shocker. I usually keep my mouth shut) that disagreed with a post by a non-running blogger. I, as nicely as possible, just let it be known that I felt like the month long subject was straying away from being constructive and now just sounded whiney and critical. I got absolutely blasted by butt kissers. Seriously? Didn't know I was not allowed to disagree with a post. How un-Stepford of me.

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  28. Solid post. As always, you keep it REAL. Even the way that you write about your running... It's just REAL to me.

    I have a blog and have never received any negative posts because, well... I'd like to think I don't write douchey stuff + the same 5 people comment on my blog. Hahahahaha.

    Can't stand the vomit-worthy praise that most popular bloggers get and yeah, totally cracks me up when they start it about how *HARD* it is to have a blog. Please. Hard? And honestly, I don't care enough about blogs, in general, to leave criticism or over-the top praise. If a question really catches my attention, or if someone has a great race or one where they could use a pick-me-up comment, then I'll chime in. Otherwise, MEH.

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  29. Ehhh...I don't know. I'm torn. Sometimes the support is nice, but sometimes it's so generic "GOOD JOB TODAY!" that it seems like it's a part of the middle-school-lunch-table-comment-game-popularity contest, which makes so SO fucking stabby. So, there.

    GOOD JOB TODAY U R AMAZING!

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  30. man, skinny runner should read this post. she is a b*i*t*c*h when people disagree and don't kiss her ass. It just makes her look like an idiot. UGH. Seriously someone politely voiced their differing opinion and you have to rip them a new one? How classy of you.

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    1. Yeah did you notice I got the treatment? It's a little manic. Sarcasm is her go-to.

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  31. I think it's because when you like someone or something, you're less likely to see their faults. And then when another person points them out, you are filled with rage. What I don't understand is why the commenters are raging on behalf of the blogger as if they're related by blood. Or maybe I'm just apathetic on the whole and can't muster up that kind of care.

    Another thing - once you begin to notice the inconsistencies present on many of these blogs, it's almost impossible to notice anything else because they're that bad.

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  32. Haha, I have to admit, I do love the criticism comments on blogs that get people all riled up. Personally, I don't think I would ever really write one though, because I guess if it bothered me that much that I wanted to say something really mean to that person, I would probably just stop reading their blog altogether. If a blog started annoying the shit out of me, I would just stop reading rather than go after them with nasty comments. They'll probably get enough of those from other people as it is :)

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  33. There's a difference between a "negative" comment (attacking the blogger or post) and one where the commenter is stating their opinion on the topic. I've written my opinion on SR's blog but NEVER end it with "HOW COULD YOU?" or "WHY DID YOU WRITE THAT"...I think when comments have finger pointing in it then all hell breaks loose. Either way, I write uber positive comments on your blog cause I heart you. Honestly, if you had a d*ck, I'll suck it.

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